Restaurants Sponsoring Beehives = BIG Rewards

BECOME A SPONSOR As Calgarian’s continue to blast the local food movement into a very hungry cannon, only a select few businesses are trending on hive sponsorship within the community. The businesses who are becoming bee hero’s not only make the streets a little more sweet but also; Support their local farmer, engage in community, and help YYC thrive by contributing to our local economy. HOW SPONSORSHIP CONNECTS COMMUNITIES AND BEES An act as simple as hive sponsorship helps to support a local and regional food business. Your connection encourages the growth of a declining bee population, helps to raise awareness about flower health, honeybee sustainability and a chemical free environment. How Does Sponsorship work? Sponsorship pays for the hive materials and bees. Maple Greenview sets up, maintains, and cares for the hives throughout the season, ensuring healthy, productive bees. Sponsored bees live luxuriously on our small plot locations. As a supporter, you’ll have exclusive access to your hive’s product allowing you to purchase from up to 100 lbs of honey per sponsored hive. Sponsorship entitles you to keep your honey for friends and family, or sell your honey for retail market prices, and share your hive sponsorship story with your customers. WHITE LABEL YOUR HONEY AND TELL A STORY Have your own branded honey jars that promote sustainable agriculture. This charming advertisement lets your customers see how much your business cares about supporting a healthy ecosystem and thriving honey bee population. Create a memorable story for your honey and your company. Hit us up for more...

Neonicotinoid Free Seeds

SPRING into Action Mama Nature keeps teasing us with her room temp breezes and beaming rays. I see a lot of Calgarian’s have spring on their mind. Even now, short shorts are in full bloom. Sweaty eyebrow season is almost upon us people! Aside from showing our pasty gams, we should also start rearing a brighter season in terms of bugs AND plants. Mo Plants Mo Bugs Mo Bugs Mo Plants GARDEN PREPARATION starts with SEEDS Shopping for seeds just got fun, make sure they are bee-friendly. Start with places like Community Natural Foods and Sunnyside Natural Market. Mackenzie seed supplier offers organic and can be purchased at Sunnyside Garden center. AVOID cheap seeds, especially from Home Depot and even if purchased from a garden center like Golden Acre, be sure to read the package. Make sure the seeds are NON-GMO. Examples of certified organic seeds are; Rene’s Garden, Heirloom and Cornucopia. Go organic whenever possible and say no to GMO seeds if they’ve been soaked in chemicals. WHAT PLANTS DO BEES LIKE? HERBS                                                     Lavender Catmint Sage Thyme Cilantro Fennel Barrage Rosemary Lavender Mint PERENNIALS Crocus Buttercup Aster Hollyhocks Anemone Snowdrops Geranium Dahlias Foxglove Irish Ivy ANNUALS Calendula Sweet Asylum Poppy Sunflower Zinnia Cleome Heliotrope Clover Marigolds BUSHES Blueberry Butterfly Button Honeysuckle Indigo Privet FRUIT & VEG Blackberry Cantaloupe Cucumber Wild Garlic Pumpkin Strawberries Watermelon Squash Raspberries Peppers Native plants attract native bees and exotic plants attract honeybees. In order to sustain a neonic free garden...

Getting Stung is a Right of Passage

The first sting of the season always sucks but at the same time feels so good. The sucky part is mostly that the poor old gal that stung ya probably bit the bullet. That’s ultimate altruism. I appreciate her sacrificial gesture for the greater good of the colony but let’s be honest, continuous stings are a true symbol that you’ve made it. You’re a beekeeper. BEE STING THERAPY To treat a variety of ailments, a doctor can shoot you up with bee venom as a form of sting therapy. Injections might be used for rheumatoid arthritis, nerve pain, MS, tendinitis, asthma, fibromyositis, and severe allergies to venom. Controlled exposure to the venom causes the immune system to adapt to the poison apitoxin in bees. Like the queen, a female worker bee can sting multiple times. Unfortunately when they sting our thick human flesh, most of them will die. The worker cast has a barbed stinger and if dug deep enough, her attempt at flying away can be cumbersome. If all her guts are left behind along with it’s stinger, well, that’s just unfortunate. Queen bees have smooth stingers so they can sting multiple times. SCIENCE OF VENOM Inside Apis Mellifera lives a potent poison called apitoxin. Depending on it’s victim, a sting can cause a person to cry their eyes out or leave a reaction no worse than tweezing unwanted facial hair. INSTIGATING A STING? A bee will only sting if instigated. Usually never outside of the hive unless accidentally stepped on . Near the hive you might get stung if; a bee is accidentally squished and an alarm pheromone is released,...

Invasive Species: Are They Naughty or Nice?

In the very first episode of Portlandia, Carrie Brownstein and Fred Armisen poke fun at the Pacific Northwest, hipster mentality. If your food isn’t prepared and eaten locally, that’s not cool man. Thoughtfully sourced food is all the buzz these days and in this case, free-range “native” chicken meat is better if it comes from a home rather than a cage. So what is all the buzz about and what is considered local? Even though the two comedians tease the hipp-ie/ster lifestyle, there are environmentally sustainable pros to this idea of “local”. However, local is nice for those who can afford it, but maybe not so practical for global hunger. Considering there are over 7 billion people living on the planet, large scale food production is entirely necessary. Maybe one day it won’t be so freaky. So all this talk about going local got me thinking about the question “is it native?”. Today I’ll explore: Are non-native honey bees good or bad for the environment? For millennia honey bees have maintained an integral part of our daily lives, humans have been domesticating honey bees since the building of the Egyptian pyramids. Why wouldn’t we keep bees? If you think about it, a beehive is the ultimate tool to survive an apocalyptic setting. The hive yields a surplus of handy supplies. Wax for candles and cosmetics, honey for cooking and booze, propolis and honey for medicinal purposes, honey and even bees as food. In 2006 we first heard about the plight of the honeybee and the devastating effects of Colony Collapse Disorder. What came to follow were great efforts to save them and...

For My Friends: A little bit about bees

Many people often ask why or how I got into beekeeping. The most honest answer I can tell you is because I love tiny things. Tiny cups are great for drinking juice in. Likewise tiny espresso spoons are good for large soups and not for savoring flavor but rather because its funny. I always say, why have it big when you can have it small… Landscapes are great and all but true beauty in the world is seen from the tiny details that comprise the big picture. The forest landscape is beautiful, it smells great and one often feels calmed by the overall energy. Try zooming in the next time you’re in a forest. You might find that there is more adventure to witness…. To further explain my affections with bees I must say I am attracted to the order of Hymenoptera… Do you hear crickets when I say that? Hymentoptera Is the order of Ants, bees, wasps and termites and they’re awesome because they are known as superorganisms; an organism comprised of many, tiny organisms. It’s not the individual bee that is badass, it is the mechanics, the labor and actions of the colony in all it’s entirety.When I see a single bee on a flower I know it comes from a huge family of about 40,000. I’ll know that that same bee is between 22 and 45 days old because from birth to death, bees perform altruistic tasks based on their age. 1-2 days is spent performing domestic duties like housekeeping; cleaning and tending to the baby brood. 3-11 days they continue to feed the growing larvae....

Sticky Snack

“SWEET honey drizzled on thick sliced sourdough Spread with em>chunky roasted garlic hummus and creamy goats cheese Completed with a tangy balsamic and truffle oil dip. Wow” The Millarville apiary has 12 hives and it is the most enjoyable location to visit. I enter a field bustling in blossom melange. Curious cattle and cautious dogs greet me at the gate which link onto a slightly crooked but well built fence. The foothills are so well manured. July makes me think of thoughtfully paired picnics, iced beverages and antihistamines. Full bloom purple and white clover flood the floor, the cows help themselves to the feast. My only thought at this point is, you’d better damn well save some for the bees! Being in my bee suite resurrects a memory I once had in a sauna. This is at least draftier than that! I visit each pallet with four hives each at a time. From Smokey and V to Coleen and even temperamental Piper, I get to catch up on all the gossip. Smoker lit, hive tool in hand, lid off, inner cover cracked. What story will you tell me today my well traveled Apis Mellifera? Bee behavior and overall temperament is gentle this early in the season. No veils necessary out of the hot zone and I am ready to have a snack with mom. At break, I stroll a few paces over to my truck called, “Lil’ Tako”. Mom has already prepared an extravagant picnic for us on the tailgate. Pulled from a wicker basket and arranged in a very edible way, she displays this lavish temptation. Honey drizzled...